Thursday, April 17, 2014

fileasmiscellaneous:

dreamrunnercarnival:

dashingthroughthephan:

niccoleeeee:

willyouliveatyourownpace:

foxyplaydate:

notazulu:

MTV answers why they dont play music videos anymore.

omg i’m crying i was not expecting that i’m laughing

mike had this vid on his site

My mouth literally hung open the entire 3 minutes..

Holy shit omg.

daaaaaamn.

Not all of us stole music… The 250+ cd’s in my room is kind of a testament to that…

(Source: nazulu)

realizethestrength:

iambettymay:

4.12 // In which Mickey really cares about Ian

What show is this?

Shameless. It’s fantastic! William H. Macy and Emmy Rossum are in it.

Mickey is the star of this season. This show is so incredible, but this past season wasn’t my favorite - aside from Mickey. His character growth has been really amazing to watch.

(Source: emmyrosum)

Wednesday, April 16, 2014
Friday, April 11, 2014
realizethestrength:

sjmk:

(via xkcd: ADD)
I’ve never related to the jokey stereotype of ADD (“I don’t have ADD… oh look there’s a squirrel!”). I’m not distracted by shiny things, I’m not a child. But this is a pretty accurate depiction.  It’s the tip of the iceberg, but this is what every minute of every day is like for me. On a really good day.

I was just diagnosed with ADD and this is amazing. Trying to embrace it and learn more about it. My therapist gave me the book Driven By Distraction. The authors have an incredible story to tell themselves. Check it out!



Hey Dan! That book came out shortly after I was diagnosed, I read it sophomore year of high school. I have a few other recommendations if you want them - I’ll have to dig out the books at home but I’ll send along the info soon. Reading about ADD every now and again really helps me a lot, it reminds me that I’m not just a lazy fuckup scatterbrain. I need to be reminded because the ADD tricks you into thinking that if you just worked harder, everything would be fine, and if everything is not fine, then obviously it’s your own fault and you should hate yourself. It doesn’t help that there are a lot of doctors out there who think it’s made up, or it only affects children, and any adult who has it and needs help or wants to talk about it is either making it up for the meds, or to get special treatment or attention. It’s such a relief to be diagnosed and read about how other people are just like you and about all the signs from childhood and college and your professional career were all pointing towards ADD and you just didn’t know. And then it’s frustrating, because you realize if you’d been diagnosed earlier you wouldn’t have suffered so much. It’s really hard when you assume people find you to be flaky, forgetful, scatterbrained, irresponsible, late all the time, can’t keep track of paper/mail/money, inconsiderate, a bad listener, a slow worker, etc. And the answer is always “try harder, pull it together, make a list, give yourself more time, try harder, do better…” People don’t realize that those of us with ADD try 1000% harder ALL THE TIME and the results just don’t show it. And we’re often exhausted, anxious, and depressed because we’re exerting so much more effort with so much less to show for it. I often feel like I’m spinning my wheels and not moving forward. And that’s with therapy and medication and nearly 20 years since my diagnosis. It is a struggle, but it also makes my accomplishments that much more important.

realizethestrength:

sjmk:

(via xkcd: ADD)
I’ve never related to the jokey stereotype of ADD (“I don’t have ADD… oh look there’s a squirrel!”). I’m not distracted by shiny things, I’m not a child. But this is a pretty accurate depiction. It’s the tip of the iceberg, but this is what every minute of every day is like for me. On a really good day.

I was just diagnosed with ADD and this is amazing. Trying to embrace it and learn more about it. My therapist gave me the book Driven By Distraction. The authors have an incredible story to tell themselves. Check it out!

Hey Dan! That book came out shortly after I was diagnosed, I read it sophomore year of high school. I have a few other recommendations if you want them - I’ll have to dig out the books at home but I’ll send along the info soon. Reading about ADD every now and again really helps me a lot, it reminds me that I’m not just a lazy fuckup scatterbrain. I need to be reminded because the ADD tricks you into thinking that if you just worked harder, everything would be fine, and if everything is not fine, then obviously it’s your own fault and you should hate yourself. It doesn’t help that there are a lot of doctors out there who think it’s made up, or it only affects children, and any adult who has it and needs help or wants to talk about it is either making it up for the meds, or to get special treatment or attention. It’s such a relief to be diagnosed and read about how other people are just like you and about all the signs from childhood and college and your professional career were all pointing towards ADD and you just didn’t know. And then it’s frustrating, because you realize if you’d been diagnosed earlier you wouldn’t have suffered so much. It’s really hard when you assume people find you to be flaky, forgetful, scatterbrained, irresponsible, late all the time, can’t keep track of paper/mail/money, inconsiderate, a bad listener, a slow worker, etc. And the answer is always “try harder, pull it together, make a list, give yourself more time, try harder, do better…” People don’t realize that those of us with ADD try 1000% harder ALL THE TIME and the results just don’t show it. And we’re often exhausted, anxious, and depressed because we’re exerting so much more effort with so much less to show for it. I often feel like I’m spinning my wheels and not moving forward. And that’s with therapy and medication and nearly 20 years since my diagnosis. It is a struggle, but it also makes my accomplishments that much more important.
Thursday, April 10, 2014
Na na na na na na na na bat-flan

Na na na na na na na na bat-flan

(via xkcd: ADD)
I’ve never related to the jokey stereotype of ADD (“I don’t have ADD… oh look there’s a squirrel!”). I’m not distracted by shiny things, I’m not a child. But this is a pretty accurate depiction.  It’s the tip of the iceberg, but this is what every minute of every day is like for me. On a really good day.

(via xkcd: ADD)
I’ve never related to the jokey stereotype of ADD (“I don’t have ADD… oh look there’s a squirrel!”). I’m not distracted by shiny things, I’m not a child. But this is a pretty accurate depiction. It’s the tip of the iceberg, but this is what every minute of every day is like for me. On a really good day.

Wednesday, April 9, 2014
spookypuke:

whoa



not sure but this might change my life.

spookypuke:

whoa

not sure but this might change my life.

(Source: amelialund13)

Tuesday, April 8, 2014
cabinporn:

Cabin on Vestmann Island, Iceland.
Contributed by Noémie Varin-Lachapelle.




still post every pic of iceland that crosses my dash. when we decide where to go next, i’ll be sure to post pics of other countries. costa rica maybe.

cabinporn:

Cabin on Vestmann Island, Iceland.

Contributed by Noémie Varin-Lachapelle.

still post every pic of iceland that crosses my dash. when we decide where to go next, i’ll be sure to post pics of other countries. costa rica maybe.
Sunday, April 6, 2014

the-legend-of-appa:

camwhoreconfessional:

fghtffyrdmnsx:

oh my god

best.ever.

is that another guinea pig in his stew?

(Source: tastefullyoffensive)

(Source: sik3rning)

Thursday, April 3, 2014

juandiegocarmona:

University of New Hampshire

that room in the library used to look so huge to me. it looks really tiny in this picture. i’ve been away for a while though.
w33dprincess:

oldtobegin:

dynastylnoire:

ladycedar:

There are a number of students in my GCSE class that have behavioural issues and if they feel uncomfortable they can do anything from storm out of the classroom to throwing chairs and punching their tables. They’re great kids, they just dont always see the light at the end of the tunnel and when they are in stressful situations they dont know what to do other than lash out sometimes. They are 10 months away from their final exams and the pressure is being mounted on them in every aspect of their school lives.
Last week one of the students saw me making little origami stars. Its something I do when I’m feeling anxious to help me focus on something else. He asked if I could show him how to make them. He had been clenching his fists all lesson, which I’ve noticed is a tell that he is struggling to retain composure. I gave him a strip of paper and talked it through with him. Soon half of the class were asking me to show them. They all picked it up really quickly.
After about five minutes and about 8 stars later, the student sat back down and was in a much calmer and motivated mood for the rest of the lesson. Our next lesson I placed a box of paper strips on my desk and when I saw anyone getting worked up about their work I silently placed a strip in front of them and let them get on with it. The lesson after I was amazed to see that students would go up to the box of their own accord, pick up a few strips and head back to their desks to continue working after calming down.
Yesterday I brought a large jar into the classroom and placed my anxiety stars in there. The boys put their strsss stars in there too. When they fill the jar I’m going to bring sweets into the lesson to celebrate them working hard and working through their problems in a positive manner. I know I’m not the teacher they deserve just yet but I feel like I’ve made a big breakthrough with them.

art therapy is important.

you can do this too, for yourself

wowwwww i LOVE this!

w33dprincess:

oldtobegin:

dynastylnoire:

ladycedar:

There are a number of students in my GCSE class that have behavioural issues and if they feel uncomfortable they can do anything from storm out of the classroom to throwing chairs and punching their tables. They’re great kids, they just dont always see the light at the end of the tunnel and when they are in stressful situations they dont know what to do other than lash out sometimes. They are 10 months away from their final exams and the pressure is being mounted on them in every aspect of their school lives.

Last week one of the students saw me making little origami stars. Its something I do when I’m feeling anxious to help me focus on something else. He asked if I could show him how to make them. He had been clenching his fists all lesson, which I’ve noticed is a tell that he is struggling to retain composure. I gave him a strip of paper and talked it through with him. Soon half of the class were asking me to show them. They all picked it up really quickly.

After about five minutes and about 8 stars later, the student sat back down and was in a much calmer and motivated mood for the rest of the lesson. Our next lesson I placed a box of paper strips on my desk and when I saw anyone getting worked up about their work I silently placed a strip in front of them and let them get on with it. The lesson after I was amazed to see that students would go up to the box of their own accord, pick up a few strips and head back to their desks to continue working after calming down.

Yesterday I brought a large jar into the classroom and placed my anxiety stars in there. The boys put their strsss stars in there too. When they fill the jar I’m going to bring sweets into the lesson to celebrate them working hard and working through their problems in a positive manner. I know I’m not the teacher they deserve just yet but I feel like I’ve made a big breakthrough with them.

art therapy is important.

you can do this too, for yourself

wowwwww i LOVE this!

Thursday, March 27, 2014

How I feel about everything in my life at the moment

whatshouldwecallme:

image